What parts do I need if I want to replace the electronics in my Sheraton Pro II?

iDreamOfSheraton

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TL;DR - Want to replace/upgrade everything electronic but the pickups in my Sheraton Pro II.

I bought a used Epiphone Sheraton Pro II on Facebook Marketplace and absolutely love it. The pickups sound almost as good as the ones in my Gibson Les Paul at a fraction of the price. However, the switch is crackling and a bit flimsy and the tone has started changing in it's own mid-strum sometimes. So I figured I'd use this an opportunity to work on my DIY improvement skills. I don't want to replace the pick-ups because I think they're great. But I do want to replace the rest of the electronics. What do I need to get knowing that this is a split coil guitar? What are some more reliable kinds of electronics?
 

Noodling Guitars

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If you want to retain the existing controls, you will need the following:

2 x 500k push pull pots
2 x 500k pots (audio taper)
2 x 0.2 mfd capacitors
1 x 3 way switch
1 x jack
and some hookup wire.

You'd also want some string or whatever it is you use to fish the new harness. Different people have different methods for this, but it's always .... "fun".... :naughty:

Also, what year is yours? You should probably see if the original harness came with metric or imperial sized pots. If the latter, you might want to stick with that. You're going to need to ream out the volume/tone holes if you want to change over to US/imperial - probably not worth the hassle.
 

iDreamOfSheraton

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If you want to retain the existing controls, you will need the following:

2 x 500k push pull pots
2 x 500k pots (audio taper)
2 x 0.2 mfd capacitors
1 x 3 way switch
1 x jack
and some hookup wire.

You'd also want some string or whatever it is you use to fish the new harness. Different people have different methods for this, but it's always .... "fun".... :naughty:

Also, what year is yours? You should probably see if the original harness came with metric or imperial sized pots. If the latter, you might want to stick with that. You're going to need to ream out the volume/tone holes if you want to change over to US/imperial - probably not worth the hassle.
Awesome! That sounds everything I'd need. Mine is a 2021 Made in China model so I'm not sure if it's metric or not.
 

Davis Sharp

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Forgive me for making an assumption, but your question suggests that this may be your first time upgrading electronics in a semi-hollow. It will require extreme amounts of patience. When you run out of that, it will require a secluded workspace where no-one can hear you curse.

You can find components on eBay and Amazon. Switchdraft is a reputably brand. For pots, I use CTS or Alpha, just a personal choice.

But you may want to try Deoxit or some other electronics cleaner before embarking on the journey of a thousand F words. Good luck.
 

iDreamOfSheraton

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Forgive me for making an assumption, but your question suggests that this may be your first time upgrading electronics in a semi-hollow. It will require extreme amounts of patience. When you run out of that, it will require a secluded workspace where no-one can hear you curse.

You can find components on eBay and Amazon. Switchdraft is a reputably brand. For pots, I use CTS or Alpha, just a personal choice.

But you may want to try Deoxit or some other electronics cleaner before embarking on the journey of a thousand F words. Good luck.
Ha! Yeah, I've watched a few videos on semi-hollow work and I'm preparing for a lot of long calming walks. Thanks for the brand suggestions, I'll look into those!
 

AJ6stringsting

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TL;DR - Want to replace/upgrade everything electronic but the pickups in my Sheraton Pro II.

I bought a used Epiphone Sheraton Pro II on Facebook Marketplace and absolutely love it. The pickups sound almost as good as the ones in my Gibson Les Paul at a fraction of the price. However, the switch is crackling and a bit flimsy and the tone has started changing in it's own mid-strum sometimes. So I figured I'd use this an opportunity to work on my DIY improvement skills. I don't want to replace the pick-ups because I think they're great. But I do want to replace the rest of the electronics. What do I need to get knowing that this is a split coil guitar? What are some more reliable kinds of electronics?

We could give you recommendation, but eventually it comes down to your needs and wants.

As for myself, I don't care if my guitars are expensive or home assembled, it's going to get modified to a curtain point according to my needs and the guitars potential.

Experiment, learn and enjoy, just like playing, guitar modification is a fun journey to embark on.
 

Willie Deuel

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Oh, man!

Yes, switching out the electronics in a semi-hollow or hollowbody guitar is nightmarish. I personally wouldn't swap out the pots unless something is physically wrong with them. If you do go that route, just make sure everything works as it should BEFORE dropping that harness into the body and fishing the pot shafts through the holes. Otherwise you're fishing everything back out so you can troubleshoot it, then re-mounting it all. Ask me how I know.

I would recommend a Puretone output jack. They really do hold the cable very securely and give a nice, satisfying clunk when plugging into them. They do cost a little more, but you'll never have to replace it.
 

Space1999

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Sounds like you just need to exercise those components. The electronics in a 2021 Epi Sheraton are more than fine.

A little De-Oxit sprayed in the toggle switch will do the trick. Just make sure you cover the finish so as not to get any on your guitar.

As for the pots they are sealed and self lubricating so all you need to do is run them around and round till they are not shorting out.

I have changed out electronics in Sheraton’s before and I will tell you that it is a nightmare the first 3 or 4 times. After a while you get the hang of it but you would have to be prepared to do the job over and over again to get proficient at it,

But I seriously believe this is not needed for your Sheraton.

Pat
 

grinwer

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TL;DR - Want to replace/upgrade everything electronic but the pickups in my Sheraton Pro II.

I bought a used Epiphone Sheraton Pro II on Facebook Marketplace and absolutely love it. The pickups sound almost as good as the ones in my Gibson Les Paul at a fraction of the price. However, the switch is crackling and a bit flimsy and the tone has started changing in it's own mid-strum sometimes. So I figured I'd use this an opportunity to work on my DIY improvement skills. I don't want to replace the pick-ups because I think they're great. But I do want to replace the rest of the electronics. What do I need to get knowing that this is a split coil guitar? What are some more reliable kinds of electronics?
Why change the electronics in the 2021 Epi?
Dust may have got into the switch, or the contacts need to be bent.
Hollow body guitar (semi hollow body guitar too) - not an easy way to learn. Especially since you do not have skills.
Les Pau is more suitable for learning.
 
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Cozmik Cowboy

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(All you who have heard this before, feel free to skip....)

My '92 Sheraton got (luckily just) damp in a flood in '96; by '13 it had developed a case of harness rot that rendered it inoperable. I replaced everything except the p/ups, which are fine.

I used:

4X CTS ±9% 500K mini-pots; I tried full-sized, but they wouldn't go through the ƒ-hole. Others with different years/factories have had no problem with the full-sized. If you're going to the trouble rewiring (and yes, rewiring a semi-hollow is trouble), I suggest not using anything except CTS or Bournes. They turn smoother and last longer.

2X Sozo Vintage Mustard .033 µF caps; most use .022 µF, but I wanted the higher value to go a little darker when I wanted, or I wouldn't have spent that much on caps -contrary to myth, the value of the cap is all that matters. Ceramic, mylar, paper-in-oil, penguin-dust-in-unicorn-sweat; doesn't matter one whit - a .022 cap will sound like a .022 cap. period.

1X Switchcraft jack; since then Pure Tone jacks have come out, and when I do my jazz box, I'll go with them.

1X Switchcraft 3-way toggle switch; if I were to do it again, I'd used the 90° one for ease of installation. Different suppliers include different nuts; I'd be sure to use one that includes both flat & collar nuts so you you don't have to wait for shipping if the one you get isn't the one you need.

Heat shrink tubing to make everything nice & neat.

Some US-made components will fit in some metric holes, some won't; only the switch didn't on mine. Be very careful reaming, as the finish can chip quite easily, and (as no one seems to sell gold washers) you'll wind up taking a round file to the hole in the stock washer to make it fit over the Switchcraft threads. Yes, I can tell you this for an absolute fact........

I stripped the old harness out, then laid a sheet of paper over it and marked the holes. I then transferred that to half of a manila folder & used that as my assembly jig. I recommend it.

And be advised that pulling the components through the holes (I tried string, but ended up using solid-core wire) will not go as smoothly as the YT vids make it seem (trust me - they did multiple takes to get that, and you probably will, too.

Good luck, have fun, and the enjoy both the functional guitar and the sense of accomplishment!

Oh - and like someone said above: try zero-residue cleaner on your switch first.
 

Norton

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I just replaced a pot on a 335... like 2 days ago. You're going to want a curved forceps/hemostat. they sell them at stewmac.... but I'm sure you can get them far cheaper on amazon etc. Long, curved with a handle lock. super helpful.

The string trick will only get you so far. Shrink tube is the easiest. But the curved forceps is my go-to to guide the pots into their holes.
 

BGood

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I am of the school of repair instead of replace and toss in the ever growing garbage pile on our planet.

Your switch can be easily refurbished. I should say maintained, as those are mechanical parts and mechanical parts ALWAYS need maintaining. A new switch will eventually get dirty and you'll fall in the same trap again. Start by cleaning its contact points (Deoxit or similar product), then if you feel some looseness, you can easily take it apart and make it tighter by bending the prongs to the inside. Don't bend too hard as it will become too hard to switch.

TADA ! Like new switch.

Toggle switch.jpg

Same for the pots. new ones will eventually get dirty. I have several Epiphone of 12-15 years and all their electronics are still flawlessly working, but I clean it all at least once a year or when a problem arises.
 

Raiyn

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I would recommend a Puretone output jack. They really do hold the cable very securely and give a nice, satisfying clunk when plugging into them. They do cost a little more, but you'll never have to replace it.
I use these in all my guitars, pedals I've built, and even my pedalboard. Good stuff.
 

Cozmik Cowboy

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I am of the school of repair instead of replace and toss in the ever growing garbage pile on our planet.

Your switch can be easily refurbished. I should say maintained, as those are mechanical parts and mechanical parts ALWAYS need maintaining. A new switch will eventually get dirty and you'll fall in the same trap again. Start by cleaning its contact points (Deoxit or similar product), then if you feel some looseness, you can easily take it apart and make it tighter by bending the prongs to the inside. Don't bend too hard as it will become too hard to switch.

TADA ! Like new switch.

View attachment 17675

Same for the pots. new ones will eventually get dirty. I have several Epiphone of 12-15 years and all their electronics are still flawlessly working, but I clean it all at least once a year or when a problem arises.
This. I should have made it clearer in my previous post that I only did the replacement as a last resort, because the original stuff got rusty & corroded; repair and maintenance are greatly to be preferred!
 

Raiyn

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Changing the electronics of a hollow / semi-hollow isn't something I'd do for funsies. Deoxit would be deployed several times before I'd even consider it - and if it needed to go beyond that point I'm getting paid - full local bench rates. Bro-rates go out the window for PITA stuff like this.
 

Cozmik Cowboy

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I just noticed I left out that the pots are all audio taper.

When I brought my garage-sale-rescue Tele back to life, I used audio on the volume & linear on the tone, but all-audio works just fine. The only thing to avoid is linear on the volume.
 

grinwer

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+ Marking Pot A (audio, logarithmic) and B (linear) is different for different manufacturers at different times.
Sometimes it's the other way around.
It is good to look at the datasheet from the manufacturer.
 


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