"Where Does The Tone Come From In An Electric Guitar"

Norton

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:rofl::rofl::rofl: he made a GIGANTIC guitar out of two different benches... but no neck.

pickups matter, construction methods matter, materials matter. epoxy and legos sounds different from plywood, fancy wood, concrete, styrofoam, aluminum on and on to the break of dawn.

there is no better, only differences. tone comes from the sum of the parts, the signal chain and the player. always.
 

BGood

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He has close to 100k views in 4 days. I bet he gets a good kickback from that.

The question that come to my mind is, what if all that video proved was that a Tele bridge pickup will sound the same whatever it's bolted to ... or not ?
 

Darkness

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Spoiler alert if anybody hasn't finished Breaking Bad! Jesse survives and becomes interested in scientific methods of testing guitar sounds.
giphy.webp



Jokes aside there have been a few videos with similar tests, this one was well done. I don't think the tone is very impacted, if at all, by the type of wood used on a solid electric. Sustain maybe, not tone.

A hollow or semi hollow electric might be a different story. Acoustic for sure is a different story.
 

littlebadboy

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To me, they all sound the same. Also, to me, the differences in tone are done by the pedals and amps. In my case, my modeler does the tone shaping. Different guitars just mean they all just feel differently to play.
 

Raiyn

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Pickups. Mainly the fingers, but pickups.
I could hand Steve Vai one of my budget axes and my Katana, and after a little fiddling - he'd sound like Steve Vai.
The video came up in my feed last night, so I watched it. It won't change the minds of the "HOW THICK IS THE FINISH?" types unfortunately, but I'm feeling damn good about my axes right about now.
 

AJ6stringsting

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I noticed that too many factors determine the tone of a guitar.

To me, here are the factors that I notice changes or affects the tone.

• wood type of the neck, fretboard . and guitar body .
• the material of the bridge .
• material of the nut .
• thickness of the electrical wire used .
• type of pots .
• ohms of the caps .
• type of finish .
• how thick the finish is .
• pickups ohms and how many milivolts and Henries the pickup delivers .
• the type of magnet used in the pickup .
• height of the pickup .
• location of the pickup on the guitar bodies string path .
• height of the string on the guitar neck .
• string gauge size .
• scale length of the neck .
• the speaker being used .
• where on the body you pick at .
• material the pick is made out of .
 

Noodling Guitars

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This is a very good video from a professor at Georgia Tech that goes into this subject:

 

grinwer

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The guitar is an oscillatory system with feedback.
Two feedbacks, at least.

1 - through hard parts - string, bridge, body, neck, nut (+ pegs) and back to the string.

2 - through the air - a string, air, and back to the strings (+ between the strings). In an acoustic (semi-acoustic) guitar, this is more pronounced.

All of this matters. How not to understand this? Yes, he's a professor! )))
 

Raiyn

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I noticed that too many factors determine the tone of a guitar.

To me, here are the factors that I notice changes or affects the tone.

• thickness of the electrical wire used .
:rofl:
As a gag / to prove a point, I wired up my SG with that 70's style gold vinyl insulated lamp cord, "traditional" push back, and finally super fine strand silicone insulated 20 AWG. Same guitar, same amp / settings, same buddy playing it who had no idea what I had done. Same sound.
 

AJ6stringsting

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:rofl:
As a gag / to prove a point, I wired up my SG with that 70's style gold vinyl insulated lamp cord, "traditional" push back, and finally super fine strand silicone insulated 20 AWG. Same guitar, same amp / settings, same buddy playing it who had no idea what I had done. Same sound.
Wow !!!! 😱
 

Raiyn

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Yup.
20220617_133747.jpg
Somehow, I still have a chunk of it left. It's not fun to solder by any stretch of the imagination.

You could run 42 ga. pickup wire the whole way and it'd work just fine. We're talking about miniscule amounts of electricity. The real reason we use a heavier gauge wire from the pickip leads (where they're connected to the pickup windings) through the tone circuit and to the output is for durability. If things didn't move, need to be adjusted, come loose, what have you - we could use super thin wires.

The project mentioned above was in response to some jack wagon bragging about changing his wires to Gavitt - period correct for teh be$t t0nez. So I grabbed literally the most unlikely new wire I could straight from Home Depot. It became my "Secret Tone Wire". :laugh2:

When it comes to current projects, I bounce between push-back, and a brand of super fine silicone insulated stuff in 24, 22, or 20AWG depending on my needs / application*. I also typically run an 18AWG ground buss so so don't have to heat the pot case more than once.

1637866190672.jpg
I used push-back here because it stays in place quite well and looks nice.
 


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